Weather Warning Heat Health Watch – Level 3

There is a 90 % probability of heatwave conditions between 0900 on Monday and 0900 on Thursday in parts of England.

Advice: Stay out of the sun. Keep your home as cool as possible – shading windows and shutting them during the day may help. Open them when it is cooler at night. Keep drinking fluids. If there’s anybody you know, for example an older person living on their own, who might be at special risk, make sure they know what to do.

What is a heatwave?

Although there is no official definition of a ‘heatwave’ in the UK, the term can be used to describe an extended period of hot weather relative to the expected conditions of the area at that time of year.

The heat-health watch system comprises four levels of response based upon threshold maximum daytime and minimum night-time temperatures. These thresholds vary by region, but an average threshold temperature is 30 °C by day and 15 °C overnight for at least two consecutive days. These temperatures can have a significant effect on people’s health if they last for at least two days and the night in between.

  • Level one: This is the minimum alert and is in place every year from 1 June until 15 September, which is the period that heat-health alerts are likely to be issued. This minimum alert simply means that people should be aware of what to do if the alert level is raised.
  • Level two: Issued when there is a high chance that the threshold will be exceeded within the next few days
  • Level three: Issued when the thresholds have been exceeded
  • Level four: Issued when a prolonged hot spell becomes severe

Why is hot weather an issue?

Many people enjoy hot weather but there can be serious health consequences from too much heat and vulnerable groups are particularly at-risk in prolonged hot spells.

What effect can a prolonged hot spell have?

Hot weather, especially when prolonged, with warm nights, can have effects on people’s health and on certain infrastructure. To aid preparation and awareness before and during a prolonged hot spell, a heatwave plan has been created by Public Health England in association with the Met Office and other partners. It recommends a series of steps to reduce the risks to health from prolonged exposure to severe heat for:

  • The NHS, local authorities, social care, and other public agencies
  • Professionals working with people at risk
  • Individuals, local communities and voluntary groups

Contact us, should you have any queries regarding your risk assessments.

 

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