Accident Reporting: Quick Facts

Incident/accident reporting is an important aspect of monitoring or measuring safety performance and allows an organisation, through investigations, to learn from mistakes and improve health and safety.

It is essential that employers introduce a reporting system in the workplace for all accidents and incidents, dangerous occurrences, diseases and near misses, for all employees, contractors and visitors. An accident report may also prompt an investigation by the enforcing authority depending on the severity of injury that has either occurred or had the potential to occur.

This topic outlines what an accident report should contain, what should be reported on in relation to RIDDOR and who is responsible for making reports.

  • The Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations 2013 (RIDDOR) require the “responsible person” to report the following instances to the relevant enforcing authority:
    • deaths
    • certain specified injuries
    • injuries that cause absence for more than seven consecutive days (including days that are not normally worked, such as weekends, but does not include the day of the accident)
    • injuries to members of the public or people not at work where they are taken to hospital for treatment
    • certain diseases and dangerous occurrences. What should be reported?
  • Reports under RIDDOR must be submitted online. Fatal and specified injuries can also be reported to HSE’s Incident Contact Centre by telephone.
  • All employees must give notice to employers of any personal injury caused by an accident at work. This is usually done by entry of the details into an accident book.
  • An accident reporting policy should be in place to ensure that all procedures are followed correctly.
  • Employees and managers should receive training to raise their awareness of the need to report all incidents and the procedures to follow.

If you require advice, please contact us.

 

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